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Debbie Bard

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Debbie Bard
Big Data Architect
Data Analytics Services
Fax: (510) 486-6459
1 Cyclotron Road
Mailstop: 59-4010A
Berkeley, CA 94720 US

Biographical Sketch

Deborah Bard, who earned her Ph.D. in particle physics from the University of Edinburgh, is a Big Data Architect at NERSC. Before joining NERSC in 2015, she worked as a project scientist on the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope at the SLAC National Accelerator Center and developed and taught a course at Stanford University on "Discovering the Cosmos."

 

Conference Papers

Tina Declerck, Katie Antypas, Deborah Bard, Wahid Bhimji, Shane Canon, Shreyas Cholia, Helen (Yun) He, Douglas Jacobsen, Prabhat, Nicholas J. Wright, "Cori - A System to Support Data-Intensive Computing", Cray User Group Meeting 2016, London, England, May 2016,

W. Bhimji, D. Bard, M. Romanus, D. Paul, A. Ovsyannikov, B. Friesen, M. Bryson, J. Correa, G. K. Lockwood, V. Tsulaia, S. Byna, S. Farrell, D. Gursoy, C. Daley, V. Beckner, B. Van Straalen, D. Trebotich, C. Tull, G. Weber, N. J. Wright, K. Antypas, Prabhat, "Accelerating Science with the NERSC Burst Buffer Early User Program", Cray User Group, May 11, 2016, LBNL LBNL-1005736,

NVRAM-based Burst Buffers are an important part of the emerging HPC storage landscape. The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory recently installed one of the first Burst Buffer systems as part of its new Cori supercomputer, collaborating with Cray on the development of the DataWarp software. NERSC has a diverse user base comprised of over 6500 users in 700 different projects spanning a wide variety of scientific computing applications. The use-cases of the Burst Buffer at NERSC are therefore also considerable and diverse. We describe here performance measurements and lessons learned from the Burst Buffer Early User Program at NERSC, which selected a number of research projects to gain early access to the Burst Buffer and exercise its capability to enable new scientific advancements. To the best of our knowledge this is the first time a Burst Buffer has been stressed at scale by diverse, real user workloads and therefore these lessons will be of considerable benefit to shaping the developing use of Burst Buffers at HPC centers.

Presentation/Talks

Debbie Bard, Using Containers and HPC to Solve the Mysteries of the Universe, DockerCon 2016, June 27, 2016,

Container technology is being used to answer some of the biggest questions in science today - what is the Universe made of? How has it evolved over time? Scientists use vast quantities of data to study these questions, and analyzing this data requires Big Data solutions on high performance computing resources. In this talk we discuss why containers are being deployed on the Cori supercomputer at NERSC (the National Energy Research Scientific Computing center) to answer fundamental scientific questions. We will give examples of the use of Docker in simulating complex physical processes and analyzing experimental data in fields as diverse as particle physics, cosmology, astronomy, genomics and material science. We will demonstrate how container technology is being used to facilitate access to scientific computing resources by scientists from around the globe. Finally, we will discuss how container technology has the potential to revolutionize scientific publishing, and could solve the problem of scientific reproducibility.

Tina Declerck, Katie Antypas, Deborah Bard, Wahid Bhimji, Shane Canon, Shreyas Cholia, Helen (Yun) He, Douglas Jacobsen, Prabhat, Nicholas J. Wright, Cori - A System to Support Data-Intensive Computing, Cray User Group Meeting 2016, London, England, May 12, 2016,

Debbie Bard, Accelerating Science with the NERSC Burst Buffer Early User Program, Salishan Conference on High-Speed Computing, April 28, 2016,

NVRAM-based Burst Buffers are an important part of the emerging HPC storage landscape. The National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center (NERSC) at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory recently installed one of the first Burst Buffer systems as part of its new Cori supercomputer, collaborating with Cray on the development of the DataWarp software. NERSC has a diverse user base comprised of over 6500 users in 750 different projects spanning a wide variety of scientific applications, including climate modeling, combustion, fusion, astrophysics, computational biology, and many more. The potential applications of the Burst Buffer at NERSC are therefore also considerable and diverse.

I will discuss the Burst Buffer Early User Program at NERSC, which selected a number of research projects to gain early access to the Burst Buffer and exercise its different capabilities to enable new scientific advancements. I will present details of the program, in-depth performance results and lessons-learnt from highlighted projects.

Posters

Debbie Bard, Wahid Bhimji, David Paul, Glenn K. Lockwood, Nicholas J Wright, Katie Antypas, Prabhat, Steve Farrell, Andrey Ovsyannikov, Melissa Romanus, Brian Van Straalen, David Trebotich, Guenter Weber, "Experiences with the Burst Buffer at NERSC", Supercomputing Conference, November 16, 2016,

Annette Greiner, Evan Racah, Shane Canon, Jialin Liu, Yunjie Liu, Debbie Bard, Lisa Gerhardt, Rollin Thomas, Shreyas Cholia, Jeff Porter, Wahid Bhimji, Quincey Koziol, Prabhat, "Data-Intensive Supercomputing for Science", Berkeley Institute for Data Science (BIDS) Data Science Faire, May 3, 2016,

Review of current DAS activities for a non-NERSC audience.