NERSCPowering Scientific Discovery Since 1974

DOE Project Taps HPC for Next-Generation Climate Modeling

New ACME project to use high performance computing to develop and apply the most complete climate and Earth system model to address the most challenging and demanding climate change issues. » Read More

Photon Speedway Puts Big Data in the Fast Lane

A series of experiments conducted at SLAC Lab's Linac Coherent Light Source is shedding new light on the photosynthetic process and demonstrating how light sources and supercomputing facilities can be linked via a “photon science speedway” to address emerging challenges in massive data analysis. » Read More

SPOT Suite Transforms Beamline Science

Most light sources have been operating on a manual grab-and-go data management model, but a recent data deluge is quickly making this practice implausible. So Berkeley Lab scientists teamed up to create SPOT Suite. » Read More

Take a "Scroll" Down Memory Lane

Visit our new 40th anniversary timeline. Find out what Disney movie was filmed at NERSC; take a tour of the machine room of the 1990s; uncover staff's 1983 holiday wishlist (hint: some things don't change), and more. » Read More

National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center

Computing at NERSC

Now Computing

A small sample of massively parallel scientific computing jobs running right now at NERSC.

Project Machine CPU Cores CPU Core Hours Used
Development and Validation of Plasma Turbulence Models
 PI: Chris Holland, University of California San Diego
Edison 16,416
Particle Acceleration by Ultra-Intense Lasers
 PI: Daniel F. Gordon, Naval Research Lab
Edison 16,392
Hadron-Hadron Interactions with Lattice QCD
 PI: Martin J. Savage, University of Washington
Edison 10,368
Hadron-Hadron Interactions with Lattice QCD
 PI: Martin J. Savage, University of Washington
Edison 6,720
Simulation of Large Hadron Collider Events Using Leadership Computing
 PI: Thomas Lecompte, Argonne National Laboratory
Carver 240

 

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Did You Know?

Saul Perlmutter—a professor of physics at UC Berkeley and a faculty senior scientist at Berkeley Lab—was awarded the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics for his 1998 discovery that the universe is expanding at an accelerating rate. He confirmed his observations by running thousands of simulations at NERSC, and his research team is believed to have been the first to use supercomputers to analyze and validate observational data in cosmology.