NERSCPowering Scientific Discovery Since 1974

When Neutron Stars Collide

The aftermath of the collision of two neutron stars has been fully captured in a 3D computer model for the first time. » Read More

DOE to Build Next-Generation Supercomputer at Berkeley Laboratory

New Pre-Exascale System Will Be Named ‘Perlmutter’ in Honor of Lab’s Nobel Prize-Winning Astrophysicist » Read More

NERSC Recognized by NASA for Contributions to Planck Mission

NERSC staff was honored with a NASA Group Achievement Award for their HPC support of the Planck Space Mission, which pushed the limits of HPC and cosmology. » Read More

National Energy Research Scientific Computing Center

Computing at NERSC

Now Computing

A small sample of massively parallel scientific computing jobs running right now at NERSC.

Project Machine Nodes NERSC Hours Used
First-Principles Catalyst Design for Environmentally Benign Energy Production
 PI: Manos Mavrikakis, University of Wisconsin - Madison
Cori 1,100
Direct Numerical Simulations of Premixed Combustion under Intense Sheared Turbulence
 PI: Jacqueline Chen, Sandia National Laboratories - California
Edison 912
Quantal Breakup Problem
 PI: Michael S. Pindzola, Auburn University
Edison 288
Improving Momentum Transport Processes in E3SM
 PI: Jadwiga Richter, National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)
Edison 285
Quantum Chromodynamics with four flavors of dynamical quarks
 PI: Doug Toussaint, University of Arizona
Cori 128
Theory of nanostructured materials
 PI: Jeffrey Neaton, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Cori 128
Theory of nanostructured materials
 PI: Jeffrey Neaton, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
Cori 128

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Did You Know?

Saul Perlmutter—a professor of physics at UC Berkeley and a faculty senior scientist at Berkeley Lab—was awarded the 2011 Nobel Prize in Physics for his 1998 discovery that the universe is expanding at an accelerating rate. He confirmed his observations by running thousands of simulations at NERSC, and his research team is believed to have been the first to use supercomputers to analyze and validate observational data in cosmology.